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Thoughts on “A Cypherpunk’s Manifesto”, part 5

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Privacy in an open society also requires cryptography. If I say something, I want it heard only by those for whom I intend it. If the content of my speech is available to the world, I have no privacy. To encrypt is to indicate the desire for privacy, and to encrypt with weak cryptography is to indicate not too much desire for privacy. Furthermore, to reveal one’s identity with assurance when the...

Thoughts on “A Cypherpunk’s Manifesto”, part 4

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Therefore, privacy in an open society requires anonymous transaction systems. Until now, cash has been the primary such system. An anonymous transaction system is not a secret transaction system. An anonymous system empowers individuals to reveal their identity when desired and only when desired; this is the essence of privacy. This is a fairly straightforward argument, but an important one...

Thoughts on “A Cypherpunk’s Manifesto”, part 3

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Since we desire privacy, we must ensure that each party to a transaction have knowledge only of that which is directly necessary for that transaction. Since any information can be spoken of, we must ensure that we reveal as little as possible. In most cases personal identity is not salient. When I purchase a magazine at a store and hand cash to the clerk, there is no need to know who I am. When I...

Thoughts on “A Cypherpunk’s Manifesto”, part 2

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If two parties have some sort of dealings, then each has a memory of their interaction. Each party can speak about their own memory of this; how could anyone prevent it? One could pass laws against it, but the freedom of speech, even more than privacy, is fundamental to an open society; we seek not to restrict any speech at all. If many parties speak together in the same forum, each can speak to...

Thoughts on “A Cypherpunk’s Manifesto”, part 1

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Ever since discovering the early writings of the group called the “Cypherpunks”, I’ve been drawn to the thoughts and ideas expressed so concisely by them. These ideas shaped cryptocurrencies and all that I am working in right now. I am saddened they are not read as wide as I’d like. On the one hand because I think they warned about a lot of things regarding privacy that...

On Blockchain Software Licenses

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Blockchain software has its roots deep in the FOSS (Free and open-source software) movement (bold is mine). There used to be a time that not releasing code under a FOSS license, like MIT or GPL, automatically disqualified a project to be seen as legitimate. There are very good reasons for this, as the aim of blockchain software is to have free and open projects for transacting with people, which...

Yesterday, the @Bitcoin account on Twitter was suspended and eventually deleted. The account, which before the Bitcoin Cash fork of 1st of August 2017 had been used for information about Bitcoin, was well-known for being vehemently pro-Bitcoin Cash and extremely opposed to the Bitcoin as developed by the Bitcoin Core Team. Since it’s removal, it has been picked up by an unknown person who...

A Cypherpunk’s Manifesto

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by Eric Hughes Privacy is necessary for an open society in the electronic age. Privacy is not secrecy. A private matter is something one doesn’t want the whole world to know, but a secret matter is something one doesn’t want anybody to know. Privacy is the power to selectively reveal oneself to the world. If two parties have some sort of dealings, then each has a memory of their...

No more “Blockchain-experts”!

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A little personal history Four years ago, during the Christmas holidays of 2014, I discovered cryptocurrencies and so Bitcoin and blockchain technology. Bitcoin had just rising to an All Time High of 1000+ dollars and of course that made it visible. My first decision during that holiday was not to invest in Bitcoin. I didn’t find my wages adequate to merit an investment. The rest of these...

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